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Design of a cloud with digital features to illustrate cloud computing technology, data storage, or data transfer to the cloud

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) is a champion among disaster recovery solutions for protecting your business’s data and applications. But how exactly does this service work? With terms like RPO, hypervisor, and more, it’s easy to get lost in the technical details or even sidetracked by myths about DRaaS.

In this blog, we share what LightBound’s DRaaS is, the technology behind it, and a basic breakdown of what DRaaS looks like in action. This will help you gain a clear understanding of how this business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) service keeps your data safe.

What is DRaaS?

Every second it takes for your business to recover from data loss or downtime matters to your bottom line. That’s why it’s key to be able to achieve a quick and easy recovery from a crisis, which is exactly what Disaster Recovery as a Service is designed to do.

With DRaaS, a third-party provider like LightBound hosts and continually replicates your servers. This allows your business to failover in a disaster scenario so you can continue normal business operations until your on-premises environment is restored to normal.

DRaaS protects both your data and infrastructure. Any time there are file changes, DRaaS automatically replicates those changes to a different location geographically—that of your provider.

All in all, DRaaS means that any time you experience downtime, it won’t be for long. With basic backup procedures, downtime can last hours or even days, but DRaaS reduces downtime to mere minutes:

  • RTO (Recovery Time Objective) is the time in the future your business will be up again, which is measured in only minutes with DRaaS
  • RPO (Recovery Point Objective) is the point in time you recover to in the past, which is measured in only seconds with DRaaS
Orange and blue document icon symbolizing a Copy, Duplicate, or Replication

How Does the Replication Technology Behind DRaaS Work?

From a more technical standpoint, LightBound’s Disaster Recovery as a Service is what’s known as a hypervisor-based replication solution. With hypervisor-based replication, each time a virtual machine (VM) writes to its virtual disk, the written command is automatically and continuously captured, cloned, and sent to the recovery site with no impact on application performance.

Regardless of underlying infrastructure at a virtual level for both storage and server locations, enterprise applications are recovered with consistency through hypervisor-based replication. The replication technology consists of:

  • A virtual manager that manages disaster recovery, business continuity, and offsite backup functionality at the site level
  • A virtual replication appliance that replicates the VMs and associated virtual disks and copies I/O (input/output) as it is created before it leaves the hypervisor

Other physically-bound disaster recovery solutions, including array-based replication and appliance-based replication, work in the virtual environment, but they aren’t optimized for it. This prevents the full benefits and capabilities of virtualization from being received.

Hypervisor-based replication bridges this gap in the data protection strategy because it is perfectly optimized for virtual environments, offering major benefits without the drawbacks of other solutions.

Benefits of hypervisor-based replication include:

  • The virtual manager, installed directly inside the virtual infrastructure, is able to tap into a virtual machine’s IO stream, making it more efficient, accurate, and responsive than prior methods
  • Continuous replication with zero impact on application performance
  • There are no guest-host requirements or additional hardware footprint
  • You can quickly move virtual machines around from one physical server or array logical unit (data store) to another
  • It’s fully hardware-agnostic to storage source and destination, able to replicate to anything from anything
  • Achieves RPO in seconds and RTO in minutes
The word "recovery" written on a notepad for disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS)

How Does Disaster Recovery as a Service Work?

1. Getting started with LightBound’s DRaaS.

Choosing your provider is a crucial first step and can make or break your DRaaS experience. Once you’ve found the right provider, it’s time to get set up.

With LightBound as your provider, we will work personally with you to create a custom plan for your company. Deployment is extremely fast, only taking a fraction of the time needed for traditional disaster recovery setups. The failover is fully configured to simplify your recovery process to only a few clicks.

Once deployed, your servers will be continuously replicated over LightBound’s private fiber optics. With LightBound you can expect:

  • Testing 2x annually to ensure a fast and efficient recovery
  • Your data is stored in an SSAE 16 SOC 2 Certified data center
  • 24/7/365  monitoring by skilled support staff
  • Guaranteed resource pool reservation

2. Disaster strikes your business.

You never know when disaster will strike your business, but when it does, you’ll want to be ready. Whether an employee accidentally formats a company hard drive or a major hurricane strikes your office building, disaster can take on many forms, big and small. Thankfully, choosing DRaaS means that no matter the cause of the disaster, you are ready.

3. Automated switch to failover operations.

Even after a disaster has struck your business, your applications are still being served through the cloud with minimal or no data loss thanks to the seconds-long RPO DRaaS is able to provide.

DRaaS fails over processing to the cloud so your organization can continue to operate during a disaster. The failover notice can be automated or manual. In a high-pressure scenario, your IT can count on DRaaS to provide automated and orchestrated processes that can be executed in just a few clicks.

For manual initiation of failover, the process is simple:

  1. Click “failover” in your management console
  2. Select the applications that need recovery
  3. Choose the point in time to which your apps need to be restored (to the point when they were not corrupted)
  4. Start the failover process

4. Automated failback.

The DRaaS operation remains in effect until your IT team can repair the on-premises environment and issue a failback order. Many businesses without DRaaS avoid failover because failback can be a huge ordeal, but LightBound’s DRaaS makes failback easy. After your environment is back up and running, it is only a few clicks to failback.

Ready to Get Started with DRaaS?

DRaaS makes recovering from disaster affordable, achievable, and fast. If you’re interested in learning more about Disaster Recovery as a Service or its benefits, contact LightBound today. Our experts will help answer any questions you might have about cloud data recovery and more.


Cloud Computing Concept with three clouds designed technologically in appearance

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between “Cloud” and “data centers”? What about Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, insourcing, outsourcing, and colocation services?  

When researching cloud computing options for your business, it’s important to know specifically what you are comparing when it comes to these often-confused terms. In this blog, we explain what “Cloud” and “data center” refer to specifically and the differences in how each cloud computing option serves your business.

Are You Talking About “Cloud” or “Data Center”?

When talking about Cloud, it’s a reference to cloud computing, which is the delivery of computing services over the Internet. Types of cloud services include infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS) and software as a service (SaaS). IaaS is further subdivided into Private, Public, and Hybrid. Cloud services come in different shapes and sizes, but most are highly scalable, handled by your provider, and you only pay for what you need when you need it.

Where it can get tricky is understanding the three models by which cloud computing is deployed: Public Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Private Cloud.

Public Cloud is the most commonly used deployment of cloud computing, where a provider manages and maintains your hosting solution for you. When people simply speak of “Cloud,” they most commonly mean this kind of outsourcing to a provider. The key to Public Cloud is that the infrastructure resource pools you subscribe to are shared by other companies. None of the resources are yours entirely or discretely in terms of deployment.

If you are talking about Private Cloud, a hosting provider still provides and manages the infrastructure, but that infrastructure is dedicated to you. It’s your dedicated resource pool, or at least most of it. You may share CPU and memory, but the storage allocation is typically on a separate SAN dedicated to you.

There’s also a combination of both Public and Private Cloud: Hybrid Cloud. Hybrid Cloud allows a company to utilize both cloud computing methods as needed for a more custom solution.

On the other hand, if you’re talking about a data center, this is insourcing. Many people call this Private Cloud, but that’s incorrect. You own the data center, the infrastructure and likely your staff manages everything. Any virtualization that takes place is simply your company buying software and virtualizing the infrastructure you own. This deployment is very traditional in every way. Insourcing is called as such because your company either capitalizes the elements or leases some of them, but it’s highly capital intensive. It’s not technically Cloud, because Cloud always refers to outsourcing.

What about colocation services? The term Colocation refers to a commercial datacenter. You are essentially leasing data center space, power, and cooling from a company that owns and manages the data center. The “co” in colocation services refers to the fact that other companies put their servers and infrastructure in the same building. That infrastructure is typically housed in separate, locked cabinets or cages dedicated to your company’s infrastructure, but you share the power, cooling and other building infrastructure.

Letters "V" and "S" written on two seperate black cubes on a wooden background with the left side behind the V colored turquoise to show the concept of comparison

The Key Differences Between Hosting Your Own Data Center and Going to the Cloud

When comparing insourcing versus outsourcing to a provider, how do you know which solution is best for your business? Compare the key differences between hosting your own data center on-premise and seeking out a cloud services provider:

Insourcing with an on-premise data center:

  • Slower time to market
  • Lacks scalability and flexibility
  • Physical and geographical constraints
  • Fine-tuned control of, and access to, your environment, security, and data
  • Increased responsibility and overhead to keep your business operations running smoothly
  • Difficult to achieve 24/7 monitoring by on-site staff
  • Increased risks, unless you are experienced with industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR)
  • Offers no geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • 4-5 times more expensive than outsourcing, assuming you have all the talent and expertise in-house to make it work

Outsourcing to a cloud services provider:

  • Faster time to market
  • On-demand scalability and flexibility
  • Independence from physical and geographical constraints
  • Relinquishing some control of your environment, security, and data
  • You can focus on your core business without the distraction of supporting a non-core business expense
  • Provider can handle 24/7 monitoring for you
  • Your provider’s expert staff should be experienced in industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR) to reduce risk
  • Provides better geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • Significant cost savings and conservation of capital, only paying for the services you need

Looking for another option?

The benefit of choosing Hybrid Cloud is it allows you to have continued control over critical data with Private Cloud infrastructure while leveraging Public Cloud services for non-sensitive data.

Having a colocation site can serve as a beneficial compromise between insourcing everything and passing off responsibilities to a provider.

3D illustration of server room in data center full of telecommunication equipment as a concept for colocation services or cloud computing technology

Which Option is Right for Your Business?

Hands down, it’s almost always a better idea to outsource data center services thanks to several financial and functional benefits. At the very least, if you still want to buy your own equipment, virtualize, and staff for the management of your own infrastructure, you can still leverage a commercial colocation data center facility to house all of your infrastructure for you in a professionally maintained environment with colocation services.

Long-term, it rarely if ever makes sense to build and maintain your own data center. There are some exceptions, for instance, if that’s your main business, you have a very unique circumstance, or you have an abundance of capital you don’t know what to do with.

Otherwise, you’ll want to seek out a trustworthy cloud services provider like LightBound, who will be a true partner to your business and ensure an easy and pain-free transition to Cloud. Contact LightBound today to learn more about your options for harnessing the power of Cloud and get answers from our experts about any cloud computing questions you might have.


Hand with marker writing the word "Facts" and crossing out the word "Myths"

Before Googling “data center services near me,” are you sure you have the information you need to evaluate potential providers? Do you know for certain that everything you’ve heard about data center hosting is true? Chances are, you’ve heard one of many myths circulating that need to be set straight.

When shopping for data center services, it’s important to separate fact from fiction so you don’t run into any surprises down the road that could leave you frustrated or disappointed. This blog reveals the truth about five major myths to give you the information you need to know before signing the dotted line on data center services.

Close-up of network cables and servers for data center services

5 Data Center Services Myths

1. An impressive-looking facility means you can expect equally impressive service delivery.

False.

The saying “don’t judge a book by its cover” absolutely applies when it comes to data centers. There are plenty of data centers that look amazing when touring the facility, but it’s also true that the devil is in the details. The distracting flashiness of certain facilities can pull you away from all of the details you need to truly consider when it comes to data center colocation, of which cost would probably not even make the top ten.

Before becoming carried away by appearances, arm yourself with the knowledge that some colocation data centers do quite a bit of window dressing to make things look better than they are. Of course, the converse is also true in that while some colocation sites aren’t much to look at, their uptime performance is top-notch. Why? Because while they didn’t focus on aesthetics, they were designed with functionality as a priority from the start and with all of the appropriate redundancies.

2. Every provider’s data center services are the same.

False.

While providers might seem similar in cost and services at first glance, it is the differences you don’t see right away that end up counting the most. Most of what data centers have and do you can’t see with your eyes, including their access to fiber, which other data centers they have on the network for secondary sites, whether they provide adequate cooling for your footprint, their expansion possibilities, and more.

You’ll want to consider key questions up front such as, “are their physical security access requirements too loose? Too tight? Or just right?” After the honeymoon is over with your new provider and you’ve settled into your new home, that’s when you’ll discover that your main point of contact is really the support and engineering staff. Every provider has a different company culture, meaning every provider will offer you a different customer experience that has the ability to make or break your services.

3. Data center services are a commodity nowadays, so pretty much anyone can handle them.

False.

Data center services are so much more than a simple commodity. As you conduct your due diligence, you’ll discover that some facilities don’t take care to apply data center hosting the correct way, doing your business a huge disservice in the process. Not every provider works with the level of care necessary when it comes to the mission-critical nature of colocation hosting services.

For example, did you know that some providers will cut maintenance costs by stalling upgrades for infrastructure elements beyond vendor recommendations? You’ll want to be sure you’ve seen your potential provider’s upgrade plans, being aware of what’s already been upgraded and what is planned for the coming year, plus how expensive and difficult those upgrades will be to achieve.

After all, most of these upgrades involve risks that may become your risks even though your provider is the one responsible for them.

4. Services in the Cloud are not as secure.

False.

Many assume that the Cloud is less secure, but this is an incorrect assumption. In fact, data center hosting providers should be able to provide far superior security compared to a typical on-premise data center. The right provider will offer protection in the following ways:

  • Advanced physical security such as registration, I.D. badges, and biometric access
  • A team of trusted, expert staff members managing and maintaining the data center, ensuring peak security and performance
  • A 24/7/365 Network Operations Center to ensure high visibility and protect your data
  • Disaster Recovery services
  • Meeting strict industry certifications and standards
  • Your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) will automatically be better because your data center isn’t in the same location as your business

Rest assured, your data will be safer with a trusted provider than you would likely be able to achieve both successfully and affordably on your own.

5. It’s a data center, so my main focus needs to be centered on evaluating the tech details.

Maybe.

How many times have you signed an agreement and found out later that it was really the people you were buying that mattered? Culture and people are what stand the test of time, every time. Carefully examine the team of people that will be there for you when the chips are down. Are you instilled with trust and confidence in their care and expertise?

What you learn about a provider’s staff will tell you a lot about the quality of that provider. As much as any provider plans, designs, and implements their systems to avoid failure, all of the systems in a data center are electro-mechanical. At some point, they will fail. It all comes down to that staff getting systems back online quickly and the transparency of communication—something you can’t put a price on.

Two business people standing and talking in data center server room with laptop

Are You Shopping for Data Center Services?

The vast ocean of information out there about data center services can be confusing, but through knowing the truth about these five myths, you can move forward in confidence, and find the right provider for your business.

Choosing the right provider will be key to your success because they’ll make a huge difference in how your services are delivered. Be sure to choose a provider like LightBound that you can trust, who is willing to sit down with you in person, answer all of your questions with clarity, and customize your solution.

With LightBound, our data centers are among the safest and most secure in the nation. Our always-on, always-available service will have your back, and our expert team is ready to ensure the success of your services.

Contact us today to learn more about LightBound’s data center services and how we can be a true partner to your business.

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Businessman using tablet pc and selecting IaaS, or "Infrastructure as a Service"

The ocean of information surrounding cloud services IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS can be a lot to sort through, but the incredible benefits these services offer make it essential to understand how each of these solutions can improve business operations through cloud computing.

In this blog, we break down the techspeak surrounding Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and put all the need-to-know information about this valuable cloud service in one spot. This way, you can gain an understanding of whether or not IaaS is right for your business, in addition to the key details to consider before signing a contract.

What is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service)?

To help you understand IaaS, you’ll want to first understand cloud services and cloud computing. Cloud services are the delivery of cloud computing resources (servers, software, storage, and more) over the Internet rather than locally.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is one type of cloud service that delivers data center infrastructure, which refers to all of the physical components that make up a data center, including:

  • Servers
  • Network
  • Operating systems
  • Data storage
  • Server racks, power, cooling

A third-party provider delivers use of these resources to you via the Internet. Meanwhile, your IaaS provider handles all of the purchasing, installation, and management of all data center infrastructure so you don’t have to.

IaaS is a pay-as-you-go service, so you can choose the infrastructure elements that you need, easily scaling up and down as your needs change—only paying for what you need when you need it.

Illustration of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) with cloud, server, and storage icons

What are the benefits of IaaS?

There are several benefits to Infrastructure as a Service in cloud computing, including:

Scalability. IaaS allows you to quickly, and easily, scale infrastructure up and down as you need it, granting you flexibility and speed to market. This is great for new and growing businesses or those that are constantly testing new products.  

Cost savings. With IaaS, all hardware is taken care of for you, so you don’t have a large capital expenditure right off the bat, nor do you have to worry about having enough manpower or expertise. You also save money thanks to easy scalability, because you only pay for as much infrastructure as you need when you need it.

Improved security. The right provider will adhere to strict industry standards, protecting your environment and data both physically and virtually. This can include redundant power, cooling, fire suppression, and physical security access, plus Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS).

Time savings. Managing and maintaining a data center is no easy task. IaaS takes this responsibility off of you and your team so you can focus on what you do best. IaaS will increase your manpower and available expertise to ensure smooth operations.

24/7/365 monitoring. Thanks to a professionally designed and maintained environment, you’ll enjoy improved performance and reliability. Even better is if your provider offers 24/7/365 monitoring. This around-the-clock monitoring is essential to increasing your visibility, ensuring all is well and the ability to know right away when it’s not. Ensure that your provider also has always-available customer service so you’re never left hanging in a time of need.

Your data isn’t in your office building. This improves your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) because if disaster strikes your business location, your data is safely secured at a separate location—that of your provider. Plus, if your office building moves, you won’t have to deal with the cost or burden of moving your data center with it.

Is IaaS right for me?

IaaS is ideal for:

  • Businesses looking for improved data center scalability, security, cost savings and more
  • Small businesses or new businesses that can’t afford or don’t want to invest large amounts in infrastructure up front
  • Businesses that want products to move quickly to market or are constantly testing will enjoy the flexibility and scalability of IaaS
  • Businesses that don’t have the proper manpower, experience, or expertise to manage and maintain a data center

IaaS may not be right for:

  • Businesses that already have a large investment in data center experts/manpower and infrastructure
  • Some very large businesses that may benefit more from investing in their own infrastructure down the line
Data center Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) server with icons depicting security, gears, cloud computing, the internet, and communication

How Do I Choose an IaaS Provider?

To enjoy the full benefits of Infrastructure as a Service, it’s key that you choose the right provider. Seek a cloud infrastructure services provider that does the following, and more, such as LightBound:

  • Offers 24/7/365 monitoring and always-on, always-available, excellent customer service
  • Has top-notch security, follows industry standards, and offers DRaaS
  • Has a whole team of experts with experience in building and maintaining data center infrastructure
  • Will work with you personally to create a custom solution for your business
  • Is trustworthy, attentive, and a true partner that cares about the success of your business

Choosing LightBound as your provider will ensure an easy transition to IaaS and continued success into the future. Contact us today and we’ll answer any questions you might have about IaaS in cloud computing to help you determine if it’s right for your business.


Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) concept with "IaaS" written in front of a spiral design and a businessman thinking in the background

How much of building and managing a data center should you handle on your own, and when should you seek out the help of a service provider? The answer to this question will determine whether cloud infrastructure services, colocation, or “DIY”-ing it, is right for you.

While there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, taking the time to determine the best solution for your business can mean increased cost-efficiency, less stress, and improved business operations. In this blog, we help make your decision a little easier by breaking down the pros and cons of infrastructure as a service.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) in cloud computing is a service in which a third-party provider purchases, installs, and manages data center infrastructure for you, allowing your business pay-as-you-go use of storage, networking, and computing resources via the Internet.

Team of network technicians in a datacenter checking security on servers

Pros of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • Less responsibility is on you and your team because both data center infrastructure and environment are handled for you.
  • You get a team of experts to manage your infrastructure for you, increasing your manpower and ensuring the success of your solution.
  • You don’t have to pay the initial start-up costs of purchasing and building infrastructure.
  • You gain increased cost-efficiency and flexibility because you only pay for what you need when you need it.
  • You enjoy improved performance and reliability thanks to a professionally designed and maintained environment.
  • You receive increased physical data center security handled by your provider.
  • If your provider also offers network services, you can enjoy improved performance and reliability.
  • You get peace of mind with a provider that offers 24/7/365 monitoring, which is difficult to achieve with a DIY solution.
  • You’ll know your data is in good hands with a provider that adheres to strict industry standards.
  • Your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) will improve because your data won’t be in the same location as your office building.
  • You can quickly scale infrastructure up and down as needed, allowing you to quickly test new products and achieve a faster time to market.
  • You’ll enjoy increased flexibility if your office building moves geographic locations because your infrastructure won’t have to move with it.

Cons of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • If you already have a large team of experts on hand or have already invested in a lot of your own infrastructure, IaaS may not be as beneficial for you.
  • You don’t have fine-tuned control over the data center or any infrastructure within it, which means relinquishing some control.
  • Some very large businesses will save money down the line by investing in ownership of their infrastructure rather than renting it.
Technician checking server's wires in data center

Is infrastructure as a service (IaaS) the right fit for your business or is it a clear mismatch? Regardless of what solution you choose in the end, the key to successful services is choosing the right provider.

LightBound is ready to help with all of your data center needs, including IaaS and colocation services. With LightBound, you can count on a successful transition, top-notch support, and continued success with your chosen solution.

Do you have questions about IaaS in cloud computing? Want to speak with a LightBound expert about whether IaaS is the right choice for your business? Contact LightBound today to learn more!

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