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Cloud computing and colocation are two popular infrastructure practices that allow businesses to have flexibility when it comes to accessing needed computing resources. Cloud computing refers to accessing computing resources that are located off-premises and are provided by a third-party. Colocation involves leasing a space in a data center to store your servers on the racks of a third-party provider.

Many companies are turning to the cloud as a way to manage growth and costs, but another option is presented with colocation. While you could store your servers on your own server rack, this requires building space that is not easily scalable. Let’s take a look at cloud computing and colocation to see which is best for you.

Here’s what you need to know about cloud computing

Cloud computing offers you many benefits. Here are a few things to consider.

Cost management issues associated with cloud computing

Cloud computing has been an attractive option for many businesses over the last several years. It allows businesses to access computing resources without having to house and maintain equipment. Because you are only charged for the amount of resources you are using, it allows many businesses to better manage costs and resources.

Scalability and cloud computing

Cloud computing offers the unique advantage of allowing you to scale as you grow. If your business expands rapidly, you need only to contact your cloud provider to increase your computing resources to meet the demands of your business.

Reducing your IT team and storage space with cloud computing

When you opt for cloud computing, you are leveraging the assets of a provider to manage your IT needs. If you are a company with limited on-premises storage space or infrastructure to manage server equipment, cloud computing may be what you need. Servers require specific temperatures maintained through large AC units and fire safety equipment to ensure that a company can maintain business operations under any condition.

In addition, choosing a cloud provider means you can scale back on your IT team because much of the maintenance, installation, and other management is already done for you.

Here’s the scoop on colocation

Colocation refers to the practice of renting space in a dedicated data center where you can store your servers. This means that while the IT infrastructure is your equipment, it is still stored off-premises. Colocation offers a unique set of benefits.

Colocation and scalability

Similar to cloud computing, colocation allows you to scale up and down as necessary. Because you are essentially renting space in a data center for your servers, you can add more or reduce as your business demands change. Also, if you are limited in your building space, you may not be able to sacrifice much-needed square footage for your IT equipment.

Cost management issues with colocation

As with cloud computing, colocation allows your business to appropriately manage costs. Data centers are already properly equipped to handle servers, fully furnished with the necessary infrastructure to keep them maintained. In addition, data center professionals are trained to handle your equipment…but it’s still your equipment.

Colocation and security

An issue that tends to arise with cloud computing is security. Businesses that operate in regulated industries, or that handle personal data, have to be extremely careful with how they manage their equipment to meet governance standards. With colocation, the servers are your equipment so you can provision them to your security specifications.

Redundancy and colocation

One other benefit of colocation is the redundancy advantages. For disaster-recovery purposes, it’s important that the beating heart of your company not reside at your physical location and that a backup version is accessible at an alternate location. With colocation, you can manage necessary redundancies to ensure you stay up and running at all times.Colocation offers many enterprises the right balance of cost management, allocation of physical resources, and scalability. Call us today to find out how we can help with your colocation needs.

Illustration for Cloud computing Infrastructure as a Service connected to the world wide web

Have you considered connectivity when choosing an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) provider? What many don’t realize is that not all IaaS providers offer the same standard of connectivity, and it can make or break the success of your Cloud service.

In this blog, we explain why connectivity is essential for IaaS and what new developments to know about the future of connectivity.

Why Connectivity is Key to Infrastructure as a Service

With Infrastructure as a Service, a third-party provider delivers use of data center infrastructure to you via the Internet. Thus, poor quality network connectivity means that IaaS simply won’t function and you can expect:

  • Slow or halted operations
  • Increased downtime
  • Frustrated clients that depend on you for success
  • Lost revenue

If you want to find an IaaS provider with connectivity you can depend on, there are three main qualities to consider, all impacting IaaS for better or worse:

1. Speed. No one wants a slow connection, especially when it comes to Cloud hosting. To ensure your business’s productivity and revenue don’t take a hit, be sure that your provider offers lighting fast speed with a large amount of scalable bandwidth available. You may also want a provider that offers the option of dark and lit fiber-optic connections for faster speeds and lower latency.

2. Redundancy. If you want to minimize downtime and lost revenue for your business, redundancy is key. Your provider should be able to automatically and seamlessly route your packets to one of many other local and international carriers if a connection is lost to achieve 24/7/365 uptime.

3. Sourcing. Choose a carrier-neutral provider that handles both network services and IaaS. Not all providers handle both, especially many larger national providers who are unable to control and manage the breadth of service. Single-source providers are beneficial because they can diagnose and fix issues holistically and manage traffic to and from all carriers. Plus, they have direct relationships with the carriers that you’ll need in the long-term to make sure data is captured securely and error-free.

Reliable, high-performing Internet access is non-negotiable because IaaS depends on quality connectivity. Only choose a provider that can ensure your mission-critical business functions stay connected.

Network connection technology in the city with 5g internet networking sign

What to Know About the Future of Connectivity and IaaS

How are technologies changing connectivity? Megaport and 5G are playing a huge role in the future of Infrastructure as a Service.

Megaport as the Next Wave of Connectivity for the Cloud

Want a simple way to achieve fast, easy connectivity? Megaport is the next wave of connectivity for Cloud and may be the solution you’ve been looking for. It’s described as “the easiest way to connect to the services that power your business.”

Megaport can:

  • Speed up your setup and simplify the process of building and deploying connections to the services your business runs on
  • Enable quick and easy network creation instead of typical siloed and complex configuration tasks
  • Connect you to cloud services, managed services, and between data centers almost instantly
  • Move your workloads in real time
  • Reach the cloud from wherever you are and transport your data between global locations easily
  • Scale your bandwidth up and down at any time, matching your connection speed with your workloads

5G as the Enabler of the Future

As described by TechRadar, “5G networks are the next generation of mobile internet connectivity, offering faster speeds and more reliable connections on smartphones and other devices than ever before.”

By 2020, 5G networks are expected to launch across the world, not to replace 4G and 3G networks, but work alongside them—at least at first. 5G is expected to contribute to the development of advanced technologies and encourage the growth of Internet of Things (IoT) with the improved connectivity it offers.

Network of physical devices with network connectivity as global network and IoT (Internet of Things) concept

Want an IaaS Provider with Connectivity You Can Count On?

Excellent connectivity is a non-negotiable for Infrastructure as a Service in cloud computing, making it equally important to choose a provider that can offer the speed, redundancy, and single-source service you can trust for peace of mind. At LightBound, we offer both network and IaaS, plus top-notch service delivery and support for the best in connectivity.

Want to learn more about the connectivity needed for IaaS success? Contact LightBound today! We’d love to answer any questions you have.

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Concept for new trends showing a hand moving forward a yellow arrow on a wood cube leading the way for a set of cubes with blue arrows following behind on a wooden table

Businesses continue to shift away from costly and time-consuming, on-premises solutions in favor of colocation services. By choosing colocation, a business is able to rent the physical space, power, redundancies, and cooling needed to house their own hardware from a provider, all while continuing ownership and management of their equipment.

While colocation isn’t considered “Cloud”, it’s a solution that still offers huge advantages to the right business in terms of time, money, and physical space savings. Whether you’re currently colocating or looking to make the switch, we’ve gathered four key colocation trends for you to consider when creating your own IT strategy.

1. Network Agility Will Be Pushed to Keep Up

Growth demands on networks are high and this pressure will only continue thanks to “the advent of 5G, increasing cloud maturity, and the explosion in numbers of IoT devices,” explains Hosting Journalist. While network agility is more important than ever, it’s equally as important to choose a colocation hosting provider with a network that can keep up with the pace of demand.

Illustration of running people with speed increasing from pixels as a concept for trends, changes, and digital transformation

2. Colocation Will Be Core to Hybrid Cloud

Hybrid Cloud solutions are on the rise, explains Data Center Knowledge, which isn’t surprising considering that Hybrid Cloud solutions offer increased flexibility and efficiency for businesses by integrating the use of private cloud and public cloud solutions. Colocation services will rise in use alongside Hybrid Cloud as businesses seek a cost-effective solution to house their private cloud solutions.

3. Evaluating Providers Will Go Beyond Cost Calculations

It’s already widely recognized that colocation services offer huge cost savings. Now, Forbes explains that businesses will look beyond that established fact when choosing a provider to evaluate how a provider will help them improve efficiency and capacity. It will become increasingly important to ask, “Which provider will give me an edge as a business?”, and “Which provider will work personally with me to create a custom strategy for success?”

Server control panel hosting software vector illustration for colocation services

4. Advanced Security Will Be Non-Negotiable

With today’s ever-increasing cybersecurity threats, security and compliance are on everyone’s minds. Choosing the right colocation services provider will be essential to ensuring you have top-notch security that can stand up to the threats. Businesses will look for a provider’s ability to offer advanced security features including virtual security, redundancy, compliance with industry standards, and physical security measures such as registration and biometric access.

Interested in colocation services?

Do you want a colocation hosting provider you can trust, that will grow with you as a true partner to your business? LightBound’s colocation services can help make your life simpler and less stressful, offering Choice Network, custom Hybrid Cloud solutions, compliance and security you can count on, and a true interest in the success of your business.

We’ll sit down with you one-on-one to ensure a successful enterprise strategy and you can rest assured knowing we’ll be there for you whenever you call. Contact LightBound today to get your questions answered and learn from our experts what a colocation site can offer your business.

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Cloud Computing Concept with three clouds designed technologically in appearance

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between “Cloud” and “data centers”? What about Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, insourcing, outsourcing, and colocation services?  

When researching cloud computing options for your business, it’s important to know specifically what you are comparing when it comes to these often-confused terms. In this blog, we explain what “Cloud” and “data center” refer to specifically and the differences in how each cloud computing option serves your business.

Are You Talking About “Cloud” or “Data Center”?

When talking about Cloud, it’s a reference to cloud computing, which is the delivery of computing services over the Internet. Types of cloud services include infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS) and software as a service (SaaS). IaaS is further subdivided into Private, Public, and Hybrid. Cloud services come in different shapes and sizes, but most are highly scalable, handled by your provider, and you only pay for what you need when you need it.

Where it can get tricky is understanding the three models by which cloud computing is deployed: Public Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Private Cloud.

Public Cloud is the most commonly used deployment of cloud computing, where a provider manages and maintains your hosting solution for you. When people simply speak of “Cloud,” they most commonly mean this kind of outsourcing to a provider. The key to Public Cloud is that the infrastructure resource pools you subscribe to are shared by other companies. None of the resources are yours entirely or discretely in terms of deployment.

If you are talking about Private Cloud, a hosting provider still provides and manages the infrastructure, but that infrastructure is dedicated to you. It’s your dedicated resource pool, or at least most of it. You may share CPU and memory, but the storage allocation is typically on a separate SAN dedicated to you.

There’s also a combination of both Public and Private Cloud: Hybrid Cloud. Hybrid Cloud allows a company to utilize both cloud computing methods as needed for a more custom solution.

On the other hand, if you’re talking about a data center, this is insourcing. Many people call this Private Cloud, but that’s incorrect. You own the data center, the infrastructure and likely your staff manages everything. Any virtualization that takes place is simply your company buying software and virtualizing the infrastructure you own. This deployment is very traditional in every way. Insourcing is called as such because your company either capitalizes the elements or leases some of them, but it’s highly capital intensive. It’s not technically Cloud, because Cloud always refers to outsourcing.

What about colocation services? The term Colocation refers to a commercial datacenter. You are essentially leasing data center space, power, and cooling from a company that owns and manages the data center. The “co” in colocation services refers to the fact that other companies put their servers and infrastructure in the same building. That infrastructure is typically housed in separate, locked cabinets or cages dedicated to your company’s infrastructure, but you share the power, cooling and other building infrastructure.

Letters "V" and "S" written on two seperate black cubes on a wooden background with the left side behind the V colored turquoise to show the concept of comparison

The Key Differences Between Hosting Your Own Data Center and Going to the Cloud

When comparing insourcing versus outsourcing to a provider, how do you know which solution is best for your business? Compare the key differences between hosting your own data center on-premise and seeking out a cloud services provider:

Insourcing with an on-premise data center:

  • Slower time to market
  • Lacks scalability and flexibility
  • Physical and geographical constraints
  • Fine-tuned control of, and access to, your environment, security, and data
  • Increased responsibility and overhead to keep your business operations running smoothly
  • Difficult to achieve 24/7 monitoring by on-site staff
  • Increased risks, unless you are experienced with industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR)
  • Offers no geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • 4-5 times more expensive than outsourcing, assuming you have all the talent and expertise in-house to make it work

Outsourcing to a cloud services provider:

  • Faster time to market
  • On-demand scalability and flexibility
  • Independence from physical and geographical constraints
  • Relinquishing some control of your environment, security, and data
  • You can focus on your core business without the distraction of supporting a non-core business expense
  • Provider can handle 24/7 monitoring for you
  • Your provider’s expert staff should be experienced in industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR) to reduce risk
  • Provides better geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • Significant cost savings and conservation of capital, only paying for the services you need

Looking for another option?

The benefit of choosing Hybrid Cloud is it allows you to have continued control over critical data with Private Cloud infrastructure while leveraging Public Cloud services for non-sensitive data.

Having a colocation site can serve as a beneficial compromise between insourcing everything and passing off responsibilities to a provider.

3D illustration of server room in data center full of telecommunication equipment as a concept for colocation services or cloud computing technology

Which Option is Right for Your Business?

Hands down, it’s almost always a better idea to outsource data center services thanks to several financial and functional benefits. At the very least, if you still want to buy your own equipment, virtualize, and staff for the management of your own infrastructure, you can still leverage a commercial colocation data center facility to house all of your infrastructure for you in a professionally maintained environment with colocation services.

Long-term, it rarely if ever makes sense to build and maintain your own data center. There are some exceptions, for instance, if that’s your main business, you have a very unique circumstance, or you have an abundance of capital you don’t know what to do with.

Otherwise, you’ll want to seek out a trustworthy cloud services provider like LightBound, who will be a true partner to your business and ensure an easy and pain-free transition to Cloud. Contact LightBound today to learn more about your options for harnessing the power of Cloud and get answers from our experts about any cloud computing questions you might have.


Businessman escaping the disaster of his hot air balloon catching fire by clinging to a red balloon and flying up into air as a disaster recovery concept

From increased uptime and data security to peace of mind, the reasons to seek out a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) provider are numerous. But unfortunately, there’s a catch: in order for your DRaaS services to be a success, you’ll want to make sure you choose the right provider. By carefully vetting potential providers for cloud data recovery, you can save yourself from headaches and know you have a solution you can count on.

Every provider is different, so how do you choose the right one? In this blog, we share eight attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider.

What is Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)?

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) is a service provided by a third-party provider that hosts and continually replicates your servers to a different location geographically in order to enable failover in the event of a natural or man-made catastrophe.

DRaaS ensures excellent business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) for your business. No matter if you are facing a hurricane, cyber attack, or human error as a threat to your business, DRaaS enables you to get back up and running with lightning speed and minimal downtime.

Hand of a businessman chooses a wood block cube with a smiley face on it instead of a block with a neutral face and one with a frowning face

How Do You Choose the Right DRaaS Provider?

To help you find an excellent provider, we’ve created a checklist of eight attributes to look for in each potential provider.

1. Their DRaaS solution allows you to recover with lightning speed. Check your provider’s Service Level Agreement (SLA) to make sure their Recovery Point Objective (RPO) is measured in seconds and Recovery Time Objective (RTO)  in minutes to minimize downtime.

2. Their solution is customizable. Your provider should be experienced and work with many different recovery environments, able to customize a plan for you and your company.

3. They keep your DR plan up-to-date so it’s perfectly executable when disaster strikes. Ideally, your provider will auto-incorporate all the latest changes to your environment so you don’t have to worry about a thing, ensuring your plan includes all the latest changes so it can go off without a hitch.

4. They have top-notch security. Your provider should be protecting your data in four primary ways: with the most secure technology in the industry, a secure environment, geographic diversity, and SOC 2 certification.

5. They are trustworthy and invested. Your feelings about your provider matter, as well as that they maintain complete compliance with industry standards set by HIPAA, PCI, SOX, and FISC. Their team should be made up of experts in disaster recovery with no shortage of experience carrying it out.

6. They’re always-on and always-available to assist you. A provider you can count on will handle monitoring your data and environment 24/7 by skilled NOC (Network Operations Center) support staff so problems do not go unnoticed and can be resolved quickly. This high visibility is essential.

7. Their DR plan is comprehensive and tested regularly. A provider that tests DR plans at least twice a year is key to preventing DRaaS failure.

8. Their customer support is excellent and ready to help. No one wants to be in a situation where you can’t get in touch with your provider. Choose a provider you know you can reach easily and communicate with stress-free.

The words "Disaster Recovery" next to a cloud-shaped icon for Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) with a server room as the background

Picking Your Provider

Don’t settle for a provider that isn’t characterized by these key traits or you might end up with a frustrating customer experience—or worse, failed disaster recovery at a time when it matters most. By choosing the right provider, it will make your DR strategy easy to manage, maintain, and achieve success.

All eight of these attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider describe LightBound. Our speedy recovery time, exemplary customer service, and top-notch security ensure you will enjoy excellent uptime and a stress-free experience. We seek to be a true partner to your business, providing a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) solution you can count on.

Want to learn more about choosing LightBound as your DRaaS provider? Contact us today and we’ll answer any questions you might have about disaster recovery solutions.

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