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Concept for new trends showing a hand moving forward a yellow arrow on a wood cube leading the way for a set of cubes with blue arrows following behind on a wooden table

Businesses continue to shift away from costly and time-consuming, on-premises solutions in favor of colocation services. By choosing colocation, a business is able to rent the physical space, power, redundancies, and cooling needed to house their own hardware from a provider, all while continuing ownership and management of their equipment.

While colocation isn’t considered “Cloud”, it’s a solution that still offers huge advantages to the right business in terms of time, money, and physical space savings. Whether you’re currently colocating or looking to make the switch, we’ve gathered four key colocation trends for you to consider when creating your own IT strategy.

1. Network Agility Will Be Pushed to Keep Up

Growth demands on networks are high and this pressure will only continue thanks to “the advent of 5G, increasing cloud maturity, and the explosion in numbers of IoT devices,” explains Hosting Journalist. While network agility is more important than ever, it’s equally as important to choose a colocation hosting provider with a network that can keep up with the pace of demand.

Illustration of running people with speed increasing from pixels as a concept for trends, changes, and digital transformation

2. Colocation Will Be Core to Hybrid Cloud

Hybrid Cloud solutions are on the rise, explains Data Center Knowledge, which isn’t surprising considering that Hybrid Cloud solutions offer increased flexibility and efficiency for businesses by integrating the use of private cloud and public cloud solutions. Colocation services will rise in use alongside Hybrid Cloud as businesses seek a cost-effective solution to house their private cloud solutions.

3. Evaluating Providers Will Go Beyond Cost Calculations

It’s already widely recognized that colocation services offer huge cost savings. Now, Forbes explains that businesses will look beyond that established fact when choosing a provider to evaluate how a provider will help them improve efficiency and capacity. It will become increasingly important to ask, “Which provider will give me an edge as a business?”, and “Which provider will work personally with me to create a custom strategy for success?”

Server control panel hosting software vector illustration for colocation services

4. Advanced Security Will Be Non-Negotiable

With today’s ever-increasing cybersecurity threats, security and compliance are on everyone’s minds. Choosing the right colocation services provider will be essential to ensuring you have top-notch security that can stand up to the threats. Businesses will look for a provider’s ability to offer advanced security features including virtual security, redundancy, compliance with industry standards, and physical security measures such as registration and biometric access.

Interested in colocation services?

Do you want a colocation hosting provider you can trust, that will grow with you as a true partner to your business? LightBound’s colocation services can help make your life simpler and less stressful, offering Choice Network, custom Hybrid Cloud solutions, compliance and security you can count on, and a true interest in the success of your business.

We’ll sit down with you one-on-one to ensure a successful enterprise strategy and you can rest assured knowing we’ll be there for you whenever you call. Contact LightBound today to get your questions answered and learn from our experts what a colocation site can offer your business.

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Cloud Computing Concept with three clouds designed technologically in appearance

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between “Cloud” and “data centers”? What about Public Cloud, Private Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, insourcing, outsourcing, and colocation services?  

When researching cloud computing options for your business, it’s important to know specifically what you are comparing when it comes to these often-confused terms. In this blog, we explain what “Cloud” and “data center” refer to specifically and the differences in how each cloud computing option serves your business.

Are You Talking About “Cloud” or “Data Center”?

When talking about Cloud, it’s a reference to cloud computing, which is the delivery of computing services over the Internet. Types of cloud services include infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS) and software as a service (SaaS). IaaS is further subdivided into Private, Public, and Hybrid. Cloud services come in different shapes and sizes, but most are highly scalable, handled by your provider, and you only pay for what you need when you need it.

Where it can get tricky is understanding the three models by which cloud computing is deployed: Public Cloud, Hybrid Cloud, and Private Cloud.

Public Cloud is the most commonly used deployment of cloud computing, where a provider manages and maintains your hosting solution for you. When people simply speak of “Cloud,” they most commonly mean this kind of outsourcing to a provider. The key to Public Cloud is that the infrastructure resource pools you subscribe to are shared by other companies. None of the resources are yours entirely or discretely in terms of deployment.

If you are talking about Private Cloud, a hosting provider still provides and manages the infrastructure, but that infrastructure is dedicated to you. It’s your dedicated resource pool, or at least most of it. You may share CPU and memory, but the storage allocation is typically on a separate SAN dedicated to you.

There’s also a combination of both Public and Private Cloud: Hybrid Cloud. Hybrid Cloud allows a company to utilize both cloud computing methods as needed for a more custom solution.

On the other hand, if you’re talking about a data center, this is insourcing. Many people call this Private Cloud, but that’s incorrect. You own the data center, the infrastructure and likely your staff manages everything. Any virtualization that takes place is simply your company buying software and virtualizing the infrastructure you own. This deployment is very traditional in every way. Insourcing is called as such because your company either capitalizes the elements or leases some of them, but it’s highly capital intensive. It’s not technically Cloud, because Cloud always refers to outsourcing.

What about colocation services? The term Colocation refers to a commercial datacenter. You are essentially leasing data center space, power, and cooling from a company that owns and manages the data center. The “co” in colocation services refers to the fact that other companies put their servers and infrastructure in the same building. That infrastructure is typically housed in separate, locked cabinets or cages dedicated to your company’s infrastructure, but you share the power, cooling and other building infrastructure.

Letters "V" and "S" written on two seperate black cubes on a wooden background with the left side behind the V colored turquoise to show the concept of comparison

The Key Differences Between Hosting Your Own Data Center and Going to the Cloud

When comparing insourcing versus outsourcing to a provider, how do you know which solution is best for your business? Compare the key differences between hosting your own data center on-premise and seeking out a cloud services provider:

Insourcing with an on-premise data center:

  • Slower time to market
  • Lacks scalability and flexibility
  • Physical and geographical constraints
  • Fine-tuned control of, and access to, your environment, security, and data
  • Increased responsibility and overhead to keep your business operations running smoothly
  • Difficult to achieve 24/7 monitoring by on-site staff
  • Increased risks, unless you are experienced with industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR)
  • Offers no geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • 4-5 times more expensive than outsourcing, assuming you have all the talent and expertise in-house to make it work

Outsourcing to a cloud services provider:

  • Faster time to market
  • On-demand scalability and flexibility
  • Independence from physical and geographical constraints
  • Relinquishing some control of your environment, security, and data
  • You can focus on your core business without the distraction of supporting a non-core business expense
  • Provider can handle 24/7 monitoring for you
  • Your provider’s expert staff should be experienced in industry regulations and handling disaster recovery (DR) to reduce risk
  • Provides better geographic separation for mitigating disaster and operational risks
  • Significant cost savings and conservation of capital, only paying for the services you need

Looking for another option?

The benefit of choosing Hybrid Cloud is it allows you to have continued control over critical data with Private Cloud infrastructure while leveraging Public Cloud services for non-sensitive data.

Having a colocation site can serve as a beneficial compromise between insourcing everything and passing off responsibilities to a provider.

3D illustration of server room in data center full of telecommunication equipment as a concept for colocation services or cloud computing technology

Which Option is Right for Your Business?

Hands down, it’s almost always a better idea to outsource data center services thanks to several financial and functional benefits. At the very least, if you still want to buy your own equipment, virtualize, and staff for the management of your own infrastructure, you can still leverage a commercial colocation data center facility to house all of your infrastructure for you in a professionally maintained environment with colocation services.

Long-term, it rarely if ever makes sense to build and maintain your own data center. There are some exceptions, for instance, if that’s your main business, you have a very unique circumstance, or you have an abundance of capital you don’t know what to do with.

Otherwise, you’ll want to seek out a trustworthy cloud services provider like LightBound, who will be a true partner to your business and ensure an easy and pain-free transition to Cloud. Contact LightBound today to learn more about your options for harnessing the power of Cloud and get answers from our experts about any cloud computing questions you might have.


Businessman escaping the disaster of his hot air balloon catching fire by clinging to a red balloon and flying up into air as a disaster recovery concept

From increased uptime and data security to peace of mind, the reasons to seek out a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) provider are numerous. But unfortunately, there’s a catch: in order for your DRaaS services to be a success, you’ll want to make sure you choose the right provider. By carefully vetting potential providers for cloud data recovery, you can save yourself from headaches and know you have a solution you can count on.

Every provider is different, so how do you choose the right one? In this blog, we share eight attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider.

What is Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)?

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) is a service provided by a third-party provider that hosts and continually replicates your servers to a different location geographically in order to enable failover in the event of a natural or man-made catastrophe.

DRaaS ensures excellent business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) for your business. No matter if you are facing a hurricane, cyber attack, or human error as a threat to your business, DRaaS enables you to get back up and running with lightning speed and minimal downtime.

Hand of a businessman chooses a wood block cube with a smiley face on it instead of a block with a neutral face and one with a frowning face

How Do You Choose the Right DRaaS Provider?

To help you find an excellent provider, we’ve created a checklist of eight attributes to look for in each potential provider.

1. Their DRaaS solution allows you to recover with lightning speed. Check your provider’s Service Level Agreement (SLA) to make sure their Recovery Point Objective (RPO) is measured in seconds and Recovery Time Objective (RTO)  in minutes to minimize downtime.

2. Their solution is customizable. Your provider should be experienced and work with many different recovery environments, able to customize a plan for you and your company.

3. They keep your DR plan up-to-date so it’s perfectly executable when disaster strikes. Ideally, your provider will auto-incorporate all the latest changes to your environment so you don’t have to worry about a thing, ensuring your plan includes all the latest changes so it can go off without a hitch.

4. They have top-notch security. Your provider should be protecting your data in four primary ways: with the most secure technology in the industry, a secure environment, geographic diversity, and SOC 2 certification.

5. They are trustworthy and invested. Your feelings about your provider matter, as well as that they maintain complete compliance with industry standards set by HIPAA, PCI, SOX, and FISC. Their team should be made up of experts in disaster recovery with no shortage of experience carrying it out.

6. They’re always-on and always-available to assist you. A provider you can count on will handle monitoring your data and environment 24/7 by skilled NOC (Network Operations Center) support staff so problems do not go unnoticed and can be resolved quickly. This high visibility is essential.

7. Their DR plan is comprehensive and tested regularly. A provider that tests DR plans at least twice a year is key to preventing DRaaS failure.

8. Their customer support is excellent and ready to help. No one wants to be in a situation where you can’t get in touch with your provider. Choose a provider you know you can reach easily and communicate with stress-free.

The words "Disaster Recovery" next to a cloud-shaped icon for Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) with a server room as the background

Picking Your Provider

Don’t settle for a provider that isn’t characterized by these key traits or you might end up with a frustrating customer experience—or worse, failed disaster recovery at a time when it matters most. By choosing the right provider, it will make your DR strategy easy to manage, maintain, and achieve success.

All eight of these attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider describe LightBound. Our speedy recovery time, exemplary customer service, and top-notch security ensure you will enjoy excellent uptime and a stress-free experience. We seek to be a true partner to your business, providing a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) solution you can count on.

Want to learn more about choosing LightBound as your DRaaS provider? Contact us today and we’ll answer any questions you might have about disaster recovery solutions.

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"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful illustration of three gears next to a laptop with an illustrated Cloud on a background of the world map in grayscale

“The cloud” is a phrase thrown around casually as though it has one specific meaning, but in reality, the cloud is a broad concept used to reference many different services and deployment models.

If you’re speaking of “the cloud” generally, then it can refer to how and where data is stored—and where it isn’t. The cloud has become important for its improvements to modern business operations. Instead of being able to run only locally on one device, the cloud enables software and services to run and be accessible over the internet.

Interested in switching your business to the cloud? Then you’ll want to think of “the cloud” more specifically, with three primary cloud service options to consider: Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS).

Knowing the difference between each of these cloud services will help you discover which solution, or solutions, could most benefit your business or organization.

"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written with a diagram to explain briefly what each cloud service option does

SaaS

Software as a Service, or SaaS, is cloud-based software hosted online by a provider that is delivered via the internet and available for use on a subscription basis.

Beneficial for startups, e-commerce companies, and short-term projects that require collaboration, SaaS is the most common type of cloud computing service used by businesses.

Advantages of SaaS include:

  • It’s managed in one central location and hosted on a remote server accessible over the internet.
  • Users are not responsible for hardware or software updates because they are handled by the provider.
  • It doesn’t need to be downloaded and installed on individual devices in order to be deployed to an entire team or company.
  • It is ideal if you use applications that aren’t in demand very often or applications that need both web and mobile access.

PaaS

Platform as a Service, or PaaS, refers to cloud-based platform services that provide a framework for developers to build custom applications. Note that PaaS does not deliver software over the internet. Rather, it provides an online platform accessible to different developers so they can create software over the internet.

This allows developers to build custom applications online without having to deal with maintaining or managing infrastructure, software, and more.

There are several advantages to PaaS including:

  • It makes the development of apps simple, cost-effective, and scalable.
  • It gives developers the ability to create customized apps without maintaining any software.
  • It reduces the amount of coding needed.
  • If multiple developers are working on the same project, or if other vendors must be included, PaaS grants speed and flexibility to the entire process.

IaaS

Infrastructure as a Service, or IaaS, is the delivery of cloud-based infrastructure resources to organizations through virtualization technology, helping businesses organize and manage their servers, network, operating systems, and data storage.

With IaaS, customers have control over their own data without having to physically manage it on-site. IaaS is also known as a “virtual data center.”

The benefits of an IaaS include:

  • It is the most flexible cloud computing model, ideal for startups and reducing time to market.
  • It allows for automated deployment of storage, networking, servers, and processing power, all handled by your provider.
  • It allows resources to be rented in a flexible, pay-as-you-go model.
  • It gives you the ability to easily scale your infrastructure as needed.
  • It gives you increased security and 24/7 monitoring with the right provider.
"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful sticky notes and posted on a chalkboard illustration of a cloud that reads "CLOUD" for cloud services

Is SaaS, PaaS, or IaaS Right for You?

To put it simply, IaaS provides pay-as-you-go use of cloud computing infrastructure that can easily and flexibly scale with your business, PaaS provides developers with a maintenance-free platform to build custom apps, and SaaS is cloud-based software that makes it easy and less time-consuming for companies to use applications.

Although these services have similar acronyms, they all serve very different functions. However, at the end of the day, all three work together to help businesses improve operations through cloud computing.

When it comes to your business, are you ready to experience the power of the cloud? Choosing the right provider will make all the difference. Contact Lightbound today to learn which of our Indianapolis cloud services is the best fit for your business.

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December 17, 2018

To All of Our Valued Customers:

As we head into the holiday season, we are excited to announce that LightBound will be merging with DataBank, a leading provider of enterprise-class data center, connectivity, and managed services. LightBound will be adding its portfolio of colocation, internet, voice, network, and cloud services to the DataBank portfolio of solutions. With the addition of LightBound’s data centers, DataBank will operate 17 data centers in 9 US Markets, including Dallas, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, Baltimore, Atlanta, and now Indianapolis.

In the coming months, we will keep you fully informed regarding the latest integration developments with DataBank. The merger with DataBank will not impact your existing relationship or services with LightBound. In fact, DataBank’s national footprint and expertise in managed services are a great complement to LightBound’s existing service offerings.

“We are excited about expanding our presence to the Indianapolis market,” commented Raul K. Martynek, CEO of DataBank. “LightBound has built a fantastic customer service reputation in the region as a trusted infrastructure provider. We look forward to combining LightBound’s strength in colocation, connectivity and managed services with DataBank’s broad product offering and national footprint.”

“Joining DataBank is an outstanding opportunity for LightBound, its employees and customers,” said Jack Carr, CEO of LightBound. “DataBank’s customer-centric approach is the reason we choose to combine with their team and be able to expand our offering and geographic footprint.” Jack Carr will continue with DataBank and lead efforts to expand the customer base and data center portfolio in the Indianapolis market.

Thank you for your continued trust and support during this exciting time for all of us!

Sincerely,

Jack Carr

CEO, LightBound