Businessman escaping the disaster of his hot air balloon catching fire by clinging to a red balloon and flying up into air as a disaster recovery concept

From increased uptime and data security to peace of mind, the reasons to seek out a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) provider are numerous. But unfortunately, there’s a catch: in order for your DRaaS services to be a success, you’ll want to make sure you choose the right provider. By carefully vetting potential providers for cloud data recovery, you can save yourself from headaches and know you have a solution you can count on.

Every provider is different, so how do you choose the right one? In this blog, we share eight attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider.

What is Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)?

Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) is a service provided by a third-party provider that hosts and continually replicates your servers to a different location geographically in order to enable failover in the event of a natural or man-made catastrophe.

DRaaS ensures excellent business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) for your business. No matter if you are facing a hurricane, cyber attack, or human error as a threat to your business, DRaaS enables you to get back up and running with lightning speed and minimal downtime.

Hand of a businessman chooses a wood block cube with a smiley face on it instead of a block with a neutral face and one with a frowning face

How Do You Choose the Right DRaaS Provider?

To help you find an excellent provider, we’ve created a checklist of eight attributes to look for in each potential provider.

1. Their DRaaS solution allows you to recover with lightning speed. Check your provider’s Service Level Agreement (SLA) to make sure their Recovery Point Objective (RPO) is measured in seconds and Recovery Time Objective (RTO)  in minutes to minimize downtime.

2. Their solution is customizable. Your provider should be experienced and work with many different recovery environments, able to customize a plan for you and your company.

3. They keep your DR plan up-to-date so it’s perfectly executable when disaster strikes. Ideally, your provider will auto-incorporate all the latest changes to your environment so you don’t have to worry about a thing, ensuring your plan includes all the latest changes so it can go off without a hitch.

4. They have top-notch security. Your provider should be protecting your data in four primary ways: with the most secure technology in the industry, a secure environment, geographic diversity, and SOC 2 certification.

5. They are trustworthy and invested. Your feelings about your provider matter, as well as that they maintain complete compliance with industry standards set by HIPAA, PCI, SOX, and FISC. Their team should be made up of experts in disaster recovery with no shortage of experience carrying it out.

6. They’re always-on and always-available to assist you. A provider you can count on will handle monitoring your data and environment 24/7 by skilled NOC (Network Operations Center) support staff so problems do not go unnoticed and can be resolved quickly. This high visibility is essential.

7. Their DR plan is comprehensive and tested regularly. A provider that tests DR plans at least twice a year is key to preventing DRaaS failure.

8. Their customer support is excellent and ready to help. No one wants to be in a situation where you can’t get in touch with your provider. Choose a provider you know you can reach easily and communicate with stress-free.

The words "Disaster Recovery" next to a cloud-shaped icon for Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) with a server room as the background

Picking Your Provider

Don’t settle for a provider that isn’t characterized by these key traits or you might end up with a frustrating customer experience—or worse, failed disaster recovery at a time when it matters most. By choosing the right provider, it will make your DR strategy easy to manage, maintain, and achieve success.

All eight of these attributes to look for in a DRaaS provider describe LightBound. Our speedy recovery time, exemplary customer service, and top-notch security ensure you will enjoy excellent uptime and a stress-free experience. We seek to be a true partner to your business, providing a Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS) solution you can count on.

Want to learn more about choosing LightBound as your DRaaS provider? Contact us today and we’ll answer any questions you might have about disaster recovery solutions.

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Businessman using tablet pc and selecting IaaS, or "Infrastructure as a Service"

The ocean of information surrounding cloud services IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS can be a lot to sort through, but the incredible benefits these services offer make it essential to understand how each of these solutions can improve business operations through cloud computing.

In this blog, we break down the techspeak surrounding Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and put all the need-to-know information about this valuable cloud service in one spot. This way, you can gain an understanding of whether or not IaaS is right for your business, in addition to the key details to consider before signing a contract.

What is IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service)?

To help you understand IaaS, you’ll want to first understand cloud services and cloud computing. Cloud services are the delivery of cloud computing resources (servers, software, storage, and more) over the Internet rather than locally.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is one type of cloud service that delivers data center infrastructure, which refers to all of the physical components that make up a data center, including:

  • Servers
  • Network
  • Operating systems
  • Data storage
  • Server racks, power, cooling

A third-party provider delivers use of these resources to you via the Internet. Meanwhile, your IaaS provider handles all of the purchasing, installation, and management of all data center infrastructure so you don’t have to.

IaaS is a pay-as-you-go service, so you can choose the infrastructure elements that you need, easily scaling up and down as your needs change—only paying for what you need when you need it.

Illustration of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) with cloud, server, and storage icons

What are the benefits of IaaS?

There are several benefits to Infrastructure as a Service in cloud computing, including:

Scalability. IaaS allows you to quickly, and easily, scale infrastructure up and down as you need it, granting you flexibility and speed to market. This is great for new and growing businesses or those that are constantly testing new products.  

Cost savings. With IaaS, all hardware is taken care of for you, so you don’t have a large capital expenditure right off the bat, nor do you have to worry about having enough manpower or expertise. You also save money thanks to easy scalability, because you only pay for as much infrastructure as you need when you need it.

Improved security. The right provider will adhere to strict industry standards, protecting your environment and data both physically and virtually. This can include redundant power, cooling, fire suppression, and physical security access, plus Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS).

Time savings. Managing and maintaining a data center is no easy task. IaaS takes this responsibility off of you and your team so you can focus on what you do best. IaaS will increase your manpower and available expertise to ensure smooth operations.

24/7/365 monitoring. Thanks to a professionally designed and maintained environment, you’ll enjoy improved performance and reliability. Even better is if your provider offers 24/7/365 monitoring. This around-the-clock monitoring is essential to increasing your visibility, ensuring all is well and the ability to know right away when it’s not. Ensure that your provider also has always-available customer service so you’re never left hanging in a time of need.

Your data isn’t in your office building. This improves your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) because if disaster strikes your business location, your data is safely secured at a separate location—that of your provider. Plus, if your office building moves, you won’t have to deal with the cost or burden of moving your data center with it.

Is IaaS right for me?

IaaS is ideal for:

  • Businesses looking for improved data center scalability, security, cost savings and more
  • Small businesses or new businesses that can’t afford or don’t want to invest large amounts in infrastructure up front
  • Businesses that want products to move quickly to market or are constantly testing will enjoy the flexibility and scalability of IaaS
  • Businesses that don’t have the proper manpower, experience, or expertise to manage and maintain a data center

IaaS may not be right for:

  • Businesses that already have a large investment in data center experts/manpower and infrastructure
  • Some very large businesses that may benefit more from investing in their own infrastructure down the line
Data center Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) server with icons depicting security, gears, cloud computing, the internet, and communication

How Do I Choose an IaaS Provider?

To enjoy the full benefits of Infrastructure as a Service, it’s key that you choose the right provider. Seek a cloud infrastructure services provider that does the following, and more, such as LightBound:

  • Offers 24/7/365 monitoring and always-on, always-available, excellent customer service
  • Has top-notch security, follows industry standards, and offers DRaaS
  • Has a whole team of experts with experience in building and maintaining data center infrastructure
  • Will work with you personally to create a custom solution for your business
  • Is trustworthy, attentive, and a true partner that cares about the success of your business

Choosing LightBound as your provider will ensure an easy transition to IaaS and continued success into the future. Contact us today and we’ll answer any questions you might have about IaaS in cloud computing to help you determine if it’s right for your business.


"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful illustration of three gears next to a laptop with an illustrated Cloud on a background of the world map in grayscale

“The cloud” is a phrase thrown around casually as though it has one specific meaning, but in reality, the cloud is a broad concept used to reference many different services and deployment models.

If you’re speaking of “the cloud” generally, then it can refer to how and where data is stored—and where it isn’t. The cloud has become important for its improvements to modern business operations. Instead of being able to run only locally on one device, the cloud enables software and services to run and be accessible over the internet.

Interested in switching your business to the cloud? Then you’ll want to think of “the cloud” more specifically, with three primary cloud service options to consider: Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS).

Knowing the difference between each of these cloud services will help you discover which solution, or solutions, could most benefit your business or organization.

"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written with a diagram to explain briefly what each cloud service option does

SaaS

Software as a Service, or SaaS, is cloud-based software hosted online by a provider that is delivered via the internet and available for use on a subscription basis.

Beneficial for startups, e-commerce companies, and short-term projects that require collaboration, SaaS is the most common type of cloud computing service used by businesses.

Advantages of SaaS include:

  • It’s managed in one central location and hosted on a remote server accessible over the internet.
  • Users are not responsible for hardware or software updates because they are handled by the provider.
  • It doesn’t need to be downloaded and installed on individual devices in order to be deployed to an entire team or company.
  • It is ideal if you use applications that aren’t in demand very often or applications that need both web and mobile access.

PaaS

Platform as a Service, or PaaS, refers to cloud-based platform services that provide a framework for developers to build custom applications. Note that PaaS does not deliver software over the internet. Rather, it provides an online platform accessible to different developers so they can create software over the internet.

This allows developers to build custom applications online without having to deal with maintaining or managing infrastructure, software, and more.

There are several advantages to PaaS including:

  • It makes the development of apps simple, cost-effective, and scalable.
  • It gives developers the ability to create customized apps without maintaining any software.
  • It reduces the amount of coding needed.
  • If multiple developers are working on the same project, or if other vendors must be included, PaaS grants speed and flexibility to the entire process.

IaaS

Infrastructure as a Service, or IaaS, is the delivery of cloud-based infrastructure resources to organizations through virtualization technology, helping businesses organize and manage their servers, network, operating systems, and data storage.

With IaaS, customers have control over their own data without having to physically manage it on-site. IaaS is also known as a “virtual data center.”

The benefits of an IaaS include:

  • It is the most flexible cloud computing model, ideal for startups and reducing time to market.
  • It allows for automated deployment of storage, networking, servers, and processing power, all handled by your provider.
  • It allows resources to be rented in a flexible, pay-as-you-go model.
  • It gives you the ability to easily scale your infrastructure as needed.
  • It gives you increased security and 24/7 monitoring with the right provider.
"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful sticky notes and posted on a chalkboard illustration of a cloud that reads "CLOUD" for cloud services

Is SaaS, PaaS, or IaaS Right for You?

To put it simply, IaaS provides pay-as-you-go use of cloud computing infrastructure that can easily and flexibly scale with your business, PaaS provides developers with a maintenance-free platform to build custom apps, and SaaS is cloud-based software that makes it easy and less time-consuming for companies to use applications.

Although these services have similar acronyms, they all serve very different functions. However, at the end of the day, all three work together to help businesses improve operations through cloud computing.

When it comes to your business, are you ready to experience the power of the cloud? Choosing the right provider will make all the difference. Contact Lightbound today to learn which of our Indianapolis cloud services is the best fit for your business.

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Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) concept with "IaaS" written in front of a spiral design and a businessman thinking in the background

How much of building and managing a data center should you handle on your own, and when should you seek out the help of a service provider? The answer to this question will determine whether cloud infrastructure services, colocation, or “DIY”-ing it, is right for you.

While there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, taking the time to determine the best solution for your business can mean increased cost-efficiency, less stress, and improved business operations. In this blog, we help make your decision a little easier by breaking down the pros and cons of infrastructure as a service.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) in cloud computing is a service in which a third-party provider purchases, installs, and manages data center infrastructure for you, allowing your business pay-as-you-go use of storage, networking, and computing resources via the Internet.

Team of network technicians in a datacenter checking security on servers

Pros of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • Less responsibility is on you and your team because both data center infrastructure and environment are handled for you.
  • You get a team of experts to manage your infrastructure for you, increasing your manpower and ensuring the success of your solution.
  • You don’t have to pay the initial start-up costs of purchasing and building infrastructure.
  • You gain increased cost-efficiency and flexibility because you only pay for what you need when you need it.
  • You enjoy improved performance and reliability thanks to a professionally designed and maintained environment.
  • You receive increased physical data center security handled by your provider.
  • If your provider also offers network services, you can enjoy improved performance and reliability.
  • You get peace of mind with a provider that offers 24/7/365 monitoring, which is difficult to achieve with a DIY solution.
  • You’ll know your data is in good hands with a provider that adheres to strict industry standards.
  • Your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) will improve because your data won’t be in the same location as your office building.
  • You can quickly scale infrastructure up and down as needed, allowing you to quickly test new products and achieve a faster time to market.
  • You’ll enjoy increased flexibility if your office building moves geographic locations because your infrastructure won’t have to move with it.

Cons of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • If you already have a large team of experts on hand or have already invested in a lot of your own infrastructure, IaaS may not be as beneficial for you.
  • You don’t have fine-tuned control over the data center or any infrastructure within it, which means relinquishing some control.
  • Some very large businesses will save money down the line by investing in ownership of their infrastructure rather than renting it.
Technician checking server's wires in data center

Is infrastructure as a service (IaaS) the right fit for your business or is it a clear mismatch? Regardless of what solution you choose in the end, the key to successful services is choosing the right provider.

LightBound is ready to help with all of your data center needs, including IaaS and colocation services. With LightBound, you can count on a successful transition, top-notch support, and continued success with your chosen solution.

Do you have questions about IaaS in cloud computing? Want to speak with a LightBound expert about whether IaaS is the right choice for your business? Contact LightBound today to learn more!

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Concentrated experienced man working in a service cabinet and repairing wires for colocation services in a data center

If you want to optimize your business’s operations, it’s important to consider how and where you’re housing your servers. For large and small businesses alike, having server infrastructure that can handle the needs of your business is critical to keeping everything running smoothly, including eventually expanding your data center as your business grows.

While you can store your server equipment in your own server racks, there is another option that can offer your business several benefits: colocation hosting.

Colocation is a service where you place your own server equipment on a provider’s server rack instead of keeping it at your business. In other words, a provider maintains and monitors a huge data center for you, allowing you to offload data center requirements so you can easily store and scale your servers alongside your growing business.

At Lightbound, we help businesses with all of their colocation hosting needs. Is insourcing or outsourcing with colocation the right solution for your business? In this blog, we outline the pros and cons of using a colocation host.

IT Engineer installs enclosure with hard disk drive in the storage system in the rack in a datacenter for colocation services

Pros

  • You get greater bandwidth with a lower cost, enjoying the features of a large IT shop without the massive price tag.
  • You are still in control because you are still responsible for your hardware.
  • Colocation hosting is more efficient and secure compared to hosting your own server.
  • You are protected by the powerful generators and backup power of your colocation provider that will keep your servers safe in the event of an outage.
  • You own your server hardware and can upgrade anytime rather than being stuck with the initial facility plan in your own data center.
  • You can easily scale your infrastructure up or down thanks to the flexible tenancy your provider offers, rather than having to completely rebuild your own data center.
  • With the right provider, your servers are stored in ideal temperatures with redundant power and cooling.
  • With the right provider, you get  24/7 monitoring and assistance, providing extra manpower to your short-staffed IT department or assisting during major upgrades and activities.
  • You have the advantage of a reliable, large-scale data center that will maximize uptime thanks to redundancy, monitoring, and expert support.
  • The right colocation provider will adhere to strict industry standards so you know your data is in good hands.
  • Colocation centers have better security, allowing you to reap the benefits of cameras, individual cage locks, and substantial access logs.

Cons

  • Colocation hosting can be costly upfront because you have to provide your own hardware and software.
  • Moving to a colocation center is a labor-intensive process. Make sure you’re prepared time-wise to transition into a colocation hosting plan.
  • Because you’re using an outside source for your data center hosting, you are not the owner of the data center. This means you have to follow the rules and regulations of that colocation, which could restrict your access to certain days and times.
  • Some people make the mistake of investing in a colocation center far away, but you’ll want to make sure it’s close to you so you can visit if necessary.
IT Engineer installs enclosure with hard disk drive in the storage system in the rack in a datacenter for colocation services

For many business owners, total control can be hard to relinquish. However, unloading some of your burdens through colocation hosting can help make your life simpler and less stressful. Colocation centers provide a great way for you to manage and scale your servers more easily as your business grows.

When deciding whether or not colocation hosting will benefit you, it’s important to weigh the pros and cons in light of your business’s specific needs and make a plan for how you will make the transition to colocation a smooth one.

At Lightbound, we provide colocation data centers to Indianapolis businesses with redundant power, cooling, fire suppression, top-notch security, and 24/7/365 monitoring. Plus, you only pay for what you need, when you need it.

Want to ensure your IP foundation is strong, minimize downtime, and reduce your total cost of operation? Get in touch with us today to learn more about how LightBound can help your business.

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