"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful illustration of three gears next to a laptop with an illustrated Cloud on a background of the world map in grayscale

“The cloud” is a phrase thrown around casually as though it has one specific meaning, but in reality, the cloud is a broad concept used to reference many different services and deployment models.

If you’re speaking of “the cloud” generally, then it can refer to how and where data is stored—and where it isn’t. The cloud has become important for its improvements to modern business operations. Instead of being able to run only locally on one device, the cloud enables software and services to run and be accessible over the internet.

Interested in switching your business to the cloud? Then you’ll want to think of “the cloud” more specifically, with three primary cloud service options to consider: Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS).

Knowing the difference between each of these cloud services will help you discover which solution, or solutions, could most benefit your business or organization.

"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written with a diagram to explain briefly what each cloud service option does

SaaS

Software as a Service, or SaaS, is cloud-based software hosted online by a provider that is delivered via the internet and available for use on a subscription basis.

Beneficial for startups, e-commerce companies, and short-term projects that require collaboration, SaaS is the most common type of cloud computing service used by businesses.

Advantages of SaaS include:

  • It’s managed in one central location and hosted on a remote server accessible over the internet.
  • Users are not responsible for hardware or software updates because they are handled by the provider.
  • It doesn’t need to be downloaded and installed on individual devices in order to be deployed to an entire team or company.
  • It is ideal if you use applications that aren’t in demand very often or applications that need both web and mobile access.

PaaS

Platform as a Service, or PaaS, refers to cloud-based platform services that provide a framework for developers to build custom applications. Note that PaaS does not deliver software over the internet. Rather, it provides an online platform accessible to different developers so they can create software over the internet.

This allows developers to build custom applications online without having to deal with maintaining or managing infrastructure, software, and more.

There are several advantages to PaaS including:

  • It makes the development of apps simple, cost-effective, and scalable.
  • It gives developers the ability to create customized apps without maintaining any software.
  • It reduces the amount of coding needed.
  • If multiple developers are working on the same project, or if other vendors must be included, PaaS grants speed and flexibility to the entire process.

IaaS

Infrastructure as a Service, or IaaS, is the delivery of cloud-based infrastructure resources to organizations through virtualization technology, helping businesses organize and manage their servers, network, operating systems, and data storage.

With IaaS, customers have control over their own data without having to physically manage it on-site. IaaS is also known as a “virtual data center.”

The benefits of an IaaS include:

  • It is the most flexible cloud computing model, ideal for startups and reducing time to market.
  • It allows for automated deployment of storage, networking, servers, and processing power, all handled by your provider.
  • It allows resources to be rented in a flexible, pay-as-you-go model.
  • It gives you the ability to easily scale your infrastructure as needed.
  • It gives you increased security and 24/7 monitoring with the right provider.
"IaaS" (Infrastructure as a Service), "SaaS" (Software as a Service), and "PaaS" (Platform as a Service) written on colorful sticky notes and posted on a chalkboard illustration of a cloud that reads "CLOUD" for cloud services

Is SaaS, PaaS, or IaaS Right for You?

To put it simply, IaaS provides pay-as-you-go use of cloud computing infrastructure that can easily and flexibly scale with your business, PaaS provides developers with a maintenance-free platform to build custom apps, and SaaS is cloud-based software that makes it easy and less time-consuming for companies to use applications.

Although these services have similar acronyms, they all serve very different functions. However, at the end of the day, all three work together to help businesses improve operations through cloud computing.

When it comes to your business, are you ready to experience the power of the cloud? Choosing the right provider will make all the difference. Contact Lightbound today to learn which of our Indianapolis cloud services is the best fit for your business.

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Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) concept with "IaaS" written in front of a spiral design and a businessman thinking in the background

How much of building and managing a data center should you handle on your own, and when should you seek out the help of a service provider? The answer to this question will determine whether cloud infrastructure services, colocation, or “DIY”-ing it, is right for you.

While there’s no one-size-fits-all answer, taking the time to determine the best solution for your business can mean increased cost-efficiency, less stress, and improved business operations. In this blog, we help make your decision a little easier by breaking down the pros and cons of infrastructure as a service.

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) in cloud computing is a service in which a third-party provider purchases, installs, and manages data center infrastructure for you, allowing your business pay-as-you-go use of storage, networking, and computing resources via the Internet.

Team of network technicians in a datacenter checking security on servers

Pros of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • Less responsibility is on you and your team because both data center infrastructure and environment are handled for you.
  • You get a team of experts to manage your infrastructure for you, increasing your manpower and ensuring the success of your solution.
  • You don’t have to pay the initial start-up costs of purchasing and building infrastructure.
  • You gain increased cost-efficiency and flexibility because you only pay for what you need when you need it.
  • You enjoy improved performance and reliability thanks to a professionally designed and maintained environment.
  • You receive increased physical data center security handled by your provider.
  • If your provider also offers network services, you can enjoy improved performance and reliability.
  • You get peace of mind with a provider that offers 24/7/365 monitoring, which is difficult to achieve with a DIY solution.
  • You’ll know your data is in good hands with a provider that adheres to strict industry standards.
  • Your business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR) will improve because your data won’t be in the same location as your office building.
  • You can quickly scale infrastructure up and down as needed, allowing you to quickly test new products and achieve a faster time to market.
  • You’ll enjoy increased flexibility if your office building moves geographic locations because your infrastructure won’t have to move with it.

Cons of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

  • If you already have a large team of experts on hand or have already invested in a lot of your own infrastructure, IaaS may not be as beneficial for you.
  • You don’t have fine-tuned control over the data center or any infrastructure within it, which means relinquishing some control.
  • Some very large businesses will save money down the line by investing in ownership of their infrastructure rather than renting it.
Technician checking server's wires in data center

Is infrastructure as a service (IaaS) the right fit for your business or is it a clear mismatch? Regardless of what solution you choose in the end, the key to successful services is choosing the right provider.

LightBound is ready to help with all of your data center needs, including IaaS and colocation services. With LightBound, you can count on a successful transition, top-notch support, and continued success with your chosen solution.

Do you have questions about IaaS in cloud computing? Want to speak with a LightBound expert about whether IaaS is the right choice for your business? Contact LightBound today to learn more!

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Concentrated experienced man working in a service cabinet and repairing wires for colocation services in a data center

If you want to optimize your business’s operations, it’s important to consider how and where you’re housing your servers. For large and small businesses alike, having server infrastructure that can handle the needs of your business is critical to keeping everything running smoothly, including eventually expanding your data center as your business grows.

While you can store your server equipment in your own server racks, there is another option that can offer your business several benefits: colocation hosting.

Colocation is a service where you place your own server equipment on a provider’s server rack instead of keeping it at your business. In other words, a provider maintains and monitors a huge data center for you, allowing you to offload data center requirements so you can easily store and scale your servers alongside your growing business.

At Lightbound, we help businesses with all of their colocation hosting needs. Is insourcing or outsourcing with colocation the right solution for your business? In this blog, we outline the pros and cons of using a colocation host.

IT Engineer installs enclosure with hard disk drive in the storage system in the rack in a datacenter for colocation services

Pros

  • You get greater bandwidth with a lower cost, enjoying the features of a large IT shop without the massive price tag.
  • You are still in control because you are still responsible for your hardware.
  • Colocation hosting is more efficient and secure compared to hosting your own server.
  • You are protected by the powerful generators and backup power of your colocation provider that will keep your servers safe in the event of an outage.
  • You own your server hardware and can upgrade anytime rather than being stuck with the initial facility plan in your own data center.
  • You can easily scale your infrastructure up or down thanks to the flexible tenancy your provider offers, rather than having to completely rebuild your own data center.
  • With the right provider, your servers are stored in ideal temperatures with redundant power and cooling.
  • With the right provider, you get  24/7 monitoring and assistance, providing extra manpower to your short-staffed IT department or assisting during major upgrades and activities.
  • You have the advantage of a reliable, large-scale data center that will maximize uptime thanks to redundancy, monitoring, and expert support.
  • The right colocation provider will adhere to strict industry standards so you know your data is in good hands.
  • Colocation centers have better security, allowing you to reap the benefits of cameras, individual cage locks, and substantial access logs.

Cons

  • Colocation hosting can be costly upfront because you have to provide your own hardware and software.
  • Moving to a colocation center is a labor-intensive process. Make sure you’re prepared time-wise to transition into a colocation hosting plan.
  • Because you’re using an outside source for your data center hosting, you are not the owner of the data center. This means you have to follow the rules and regulations of that colocation, which could restrict your access to certain days and times.
  • Some people make the mistake of investing in a colocation center far away, but you’ll want to make sure it’s close to you so you can visit if necessary.
IT Engineer installs enclosure with hard disk drive in the storage system in the rack in a datacenter for colocation services

For many business owners, total control can be hard to relinquish. However, unloading some of your burdens through colocation hosting can help make your life simpler and less stressful. Colocation centers provide a great way for you to manage and scale your servers more easily as your business grows.

When deciding whether or not colocation hosting will benefit you, it’s important to weigh the pros and cons in light of your business’s specific needs and make a plan for how you will make the transition to colocation a smooth one.

At Lightbound, we provide colocation data centers to Indianapolis businesses with redundant power, cooling, fire suppression, top-notch security, and 24/7/365 monitoring. Plus, you only pay for what you need, when you need it.

Want to ensure your IP foundation is strong, minimize downtime, and reduce your total cost of operation? Get in touch with us today to learn more about how LightBound can help your business.

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It’s the holiday season and 2019 is fast approaching! Before we hit the new year, and with the warm feelings of the holiday spirit all around us, we wanted to take a moment to thank our customers, employees, and everyone who’s supported LightBound.

Our success is thanks to you, not only during this incredible year of 2018, but during all of  the years since LightBound’s founding in 1994. Thank you!

As you may have already heard or read in our announcement, LightBound will soon be merging with DataBank, a leading provider of enterprise-class data center, connectivity, and managed services. We are looking forward to an amazing future with DataBank!

We could not be more excited at LightBound for this incredible opportunity because, as Raul K. Martynek, CEO of DataBank, explained, the merger will combine LightBound’s strengths “in colocation, connectivity, and managed services with DataBank’s broad product offering and national footprint.”

“Joining DataBank is an outstanding opportunity for LightBound, its employees and customers.” – Jack Carr, CEO of LightBound

DataBank’s customer-centric approach is why we chose to “combine with their team and be able to expand our offering and geographic footprint,” explained our very own CEO, Jack Carr.

As you may already know, this merger will not impact your existing relationship or services with LightBound. DataBank’s services are a great complement to LightBound’s services.

DataBank’s portfolio of solutions will gain the following services from LightBound:

    • Colocation
    • Internet
    • Voice
    • Network
  • Cloud services

Here are some facts to know about DataBank:

    • DataBank offers customers 100% uptime availability of data, applications, and infrastructure anchored in world-class facilities
    • DataBank’s customized technology solutions are designed to help customers effectively manage risk, improve their technology performance, and allow them to focus on their core business objectives
    • DataBank is headquartered in the historic former Federal Reserve Bank Building, in downtown Dallas, TX
  • DataBank will operate 17 data centers in 9 US Markets, including Dallas, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, Baltimore, Atlanta, and now Indianapolis

You can read DataBank’s announcement of our big news here and the Inside Indiana Business story here.

The words "Thank you" written on a blurred lights background

We will keep you informed with more information about our integration as the latest developments happen. Thank you again for your continued support and trust. We look forward to a wonderful year ahead!

December 17, 2018

To All of Our Valued Customers:

As we head into the holiday season, we are excited to announce that LightBound will be merging with DataBank, a leading provider of enterprise-class data center, connectivity, and managed services. LightBound will be adding its portfolio of colocation, internet, voice, network, and cloud services to the DataBank portfolio of solutions. With the addition of LightBound’s data centers, DataBank will operate 17 data centers in 9 US Markets, including Dallas, Minneapolis, Kansas City, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, Baltimore, Atlanta, and now Indianapolis.

In the coming months, we will keep you fully informed regarding the latest integration developments with DataBank. The merger with DataBank will not impact your existing relationship or services with LightBound. In fact, DataBank’s national footprint and expertise in managed services are a great complement to LightBound’s existing service offerings.

“We are excited about expanding our presence to the Indianapolis market,” commented Raul K. Martynek, CEO of DataBank. “LightBound has built a fantastic customer service reputation in the region as a trusted infrastructure provider. We look forward to combining LightBound’s strength in colocation, connectivity and managed services with DataBank’s broad product offering and national footprint.”

“Joining DataBank is an outstanding opportunity for LightBound, its employees and customers,” said Jack Carr, CEO of LightBound. “DataBank’s customer-centric approach is the reason we choose to combine with their team and be able to expand our offering and geographic footprint.” Jack Carr will continue with DataBank and lead efforts to expand the customer base and data center portfolio in the Indianapolis market.

Thank you for your continued trust and support during this exciting time for all of us!

Sincerely,

Jack Carr

CEO, LightBound